War in Nagorno-Karabakh Might be Fought With Funds Coming from Moscow, Says Russian Economist

War in Nagorno-Karabakh Might be Fought With Funds Coming from Moscow, Says Russian Economist

Photo: https://www.rbc.ru/

As an example, Mikhail Delyagin, a well-known Russian economist, publicist and radio host, mentioned Araz Agalarov. He is a well-known Russian businessman who comes from Azerbaijan and owns a fairly big business in Russia. According to Forbes, an authoritative and popular magazine, Agalarov is 55th on the list of 200 richest people of Russia.

Since the first days when the armed conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, the Armenian-populated enclave region of Azerbaijan, started aggravating, political scientists, military analysts and other experts have given so many assessments of the situation that it is very understandable why an ordinary person might get confused in what is happening. Anyway, today, the major talking points are limited to several factors.

First, according to experts, the conflict began to look like a full-scale war. In addition, they stress the presence of many reasons for considering Turkey as a party to the armed conflict, which supports Azerbaijan. Earlier, the latter announced a large-scale counter-offensive operation along the entire contact line in Nagorno-Karabakh.

Meanwhile, it is much more important to understand that the parties are resorting to no-nonsense weapons. The shelling continues every day. The mass media report about massive air strikes that hit settlements, as well as about casualties not only among the military but also among the civilian population. In other words, at present, there is another hotbed of tensions in the world, and the scale of the problem is quite comparable to the armed conflict in Donbass.

At the same time, according to Mikhail Delyagin, the war in Nagorno-Karabakh is likely to be waged with the funds coming from Moscow. He said that this conclusion was made on the basis of a number of factors. However, Delyagin decided to explain for his opinion step-by-step. As an example, he mentioned Araz Agalarov. He is a well-known Russian businessman who owns a fairly big business in the country and is originally from Azerbaijan. According to Forbes, an authoritative and popular magazine, Agalarov is 55th on the list of 200 richest people of Russia.

Delyagin says that, first and foremost, the Azerbaijani authorities, unlike the Russian authorities, work with their oligarchs along a fairly simple pattern. If some business is booming, its owner is asked to finance certain social or infrastructural projects. Delyagin even recalled that during his visit to Baku, he was shown new residential areas and told how they had been put in order. “This neighborhood was renovated by the person who wanted to take the position of deputy minister,” Delyagin said. “At first, he had to renovate the whole district. He had to show that he knew how to handle his own money. Only after that he would be entrusted with state money.”

At the same time, Delyagin says that this approach has much in common with corruption but seems to be viable. “If someone loves his or her homeland, in this conflict he or she should also be on its side,” he said commenting on Agalarov’s activities. “This applies to everyone, including oligarchs. Many of them might think, well, why not to take their “piece of money” from Moscow’s budget and not share it with their homeland.”

In Mikhail Delyagin’s opinion, the same is true of Armenia, as there is roughly the same approach. “The situation is similar in Armenia,” said Delyagin. “How was this road built over there? This is our businessman who transferred money from Russia, and, as a result, we have got a good road. In other words, people don't steal. They try to bring that money home. That is, probably, the war in Nagorno-Karabakh is fought with money from Moscow’s budget that the oligarchs in question transferred to their homelands.”

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