Historian Sees Claims to Kazakhstani Territory in Putin's Report

Historian Sees Claims to Kazakhstani  Territory in Putin's Report

Photo: http://mk.ru

Russian political scientist and doctor of historical sciences, Valery Sovoley, has discerned territorial claims to Kazakhstan in Vladimir Putin's recent report and latest statements. He believes that all the statements made in the Kremlin regarding history focus only on the future, and they should be taken as seriously as possible.

Vladimir Putin's article about World War II has been scrutinized by the expert community. Some experts say that it is a response to the information attack by the West attempting to rewrite the history of the Great Patriotic War, as the war between Germany, its satellites and the USSR is known across the post-Soviet space. Others believe that it was published in relation to the Victory Parade, which took place on June 24.

However, there is another opinion, too. For instance, Dr. Solovey has discerned claims to the territory of Kazakhstan in Putin's report and latest statements. According to him, all the statements made in the Kremlin regarding history focus only on the future, and they should be taken as seriously as possible.

Valery Solovey made this statement during an interview with Mark Feigin, a reporter and political personality.

In terms of analysis of the pre-war period, are there any fundamentally new ideas in Putin's article in your opinion? Why do we need an article of this kind?

“As for the article itself, I have not seen anything new in it. I knew the major part of the information cited there from a university course of the USSR history, which I took in 1981.

“It should be noted that Vladimir Putin's article on World War II should be taken extremely seriously. Firstly, this article is a consistent expression of his personal worldview. Secondly, it has nothing to do with history. It has to do with the present and the future. This article is timed for June 22 [the Day of Remembrance and Sorrowing in Russia, marking the day when Nazi Germany and its allies invaded the USSR in 1941 – ed.] and June 24, but essentially, it is a projection into the future. There is no doubt about it, because everything falls into a logical sequence. Let me explain. First, we learn that the Baltic countries were legally incorporated. Then we find out that the countries of the former USSR left it with violations of international law and took away some Russian territories.

“I would like to underline the great ‘hello’ that Kazakhstan received through this article. This is a new part of the concept, because unlike [former Kazakhstani President] Nursultan Nazarbayev, Vladimir Putin is not friends with Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, [incumbent] President of Kazakhstan. I strongly believe that all these actions are “greetings” to Kazakhstan.

“Most importantly, all the Kremlin's statements are future-oriented. I would like to emphasize that all this is an ideological legitimization of what might be said in the future. “You left the great USSR in violation of international law, so we, Russia, as the legal successor to the USSR have every right to restore historical justice.”

Chances are we will hear this very soon,” said Valery Solovey. “There should be no doubt about it.”

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